Justina Walford Babbles

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The Father’s Prayer and Worm Food

OMG (maybe literally). I was debating afterlife with someone and we got to the point of really asking why. WHY an afterlife? And I said, atheistically, “Being worm food IS wondrous. We become a part of the planet that let us spin for so many years. We recycle our dust into a far greater cosmos. We are part of this wondrous universe. There is no need for us to live longer in a heaven. it is enough to live one lifetime right here.”

And then I realized long ago, someone wise in my life interpreted the beginning of the Father’s Prayer to mean that exact same thing.

This is me having a moment of thinking everyone agrees. Don’t debate it for just 5 minutes. I kinda like the feeling.

 

Wow, that's a lot of bling for a temporal body.

Wow, that’s a lot of bling for a temporal body.

 

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3 comments on “The Father’s Prayer and Worm Food

  1. Daniel Ionson
    November 22, 2013

    Interesting. I am anti-religious, and yet I long to live forever. If death is an eraser, then every moment I have ever lived gets annihilated. I find that heartbreaking (although it could be true).

    • splitid
      November 23, 2013

      Some days I feel very heartbroken about mortality, too. It is much easier to sense beauty in the cycle of life and death when I’m in perfect health and all loved ones are in perfect health. But when confronted with the reality of my body, I hear you. First strong reaction to my own mortality: I want more time.

      And I think having a positive feeling about our own mortality is such a challenge to us as humans, that’s why so long ago people created methods to make this very moment as palatable and complete as possible.

      Some created a daily prayer asking for this very second to be Heaven and on another side of the globe some created a meditation geared to feeling this moment, the only existing moment, with no emotional connection to the future not yet confirmed and the past gone forever.

      I think as an atheist, I feel better knowing I’m a tiny blip in the universe and any of my mistakes will not be too devastating. And believing the only reward for what I do now is the feeling I get for doing it also gets me focused on my immediate action..

      And maybe this is why I don’t understand wanting an afterlife. it’s cheating the process and cheating one’s own self in pursuing a life in the moment. You still fear death because you expect a judgment day but you don’t feel the preciousness of now because you think when you die, THAT will be the icing on the cake.

  2. Daniel Ionson
    November 23, 2013

    I agree that that’s the case for those who believe in various “reward/punishment” systems. But for those of us outside of their camps, the situation is more complex.
    It’s not just a scenario of “I have a hamburger, but I can’t enjoy it cuz I want a trillion hamburgers.”
    The picture is this: Everything about our lives: all of our joys, inner-dialogues, feelings, on and on… can be enjoyed for the present. But if (true/final) death comes to us, then all of it is lost. There will have been no “one hamburger” at all, because if my psyche is annihilated, then everything is utterly erased. If it’s erased, then it’s equal to having never happened in the first place.
    Sure, others may remember us, but if their psyche’s are also erased, then whatever memories they had are wiped out also. If I’m one of the world’s greats, let’s say, Mother Theresa, it ultimately is also irrelevant. The name/figure head, “Mother Theresam” is merely an utterance to an idea, not actually holding onto the personhood. And, even if it were, when the last memory of a person dies with the last rememberer, again, annihilation.
    So, here is where I’ve landed: I escaped all religion after years of doing philosophy (and man, was I surprised). But I still find the best explanation for our existence to be that there is some “Being” out there which created Energy [Space/Time...]. (I see no better conclusion than to affirm that the Cosmological Argument [and the Kalam version of it] is valid.) However, this does nothing to affirm that any of the religions about ["God"] are true. Therefore, I have no evidence that the “Being” will extend my consciousness beyond me taking the ol’ dirt nap. But it’s possible, and I hope it could be true.

    Thanks for your blog!

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This entry was posted on November 22, 2013 by in Philosophy? and tagged , , , , , .
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